Some wheelchair accessible venues in London for meetings and events

If you want to find an accessible venue in London, Access Able (previously Disabled Go) is a good place to start – https://www.accessable.co.uk/.  They do fairly comprehensive audits of particular venues, and you can search by location, type and name of venue (type the name of the venue in the box labelled ‘I’m looking for…’) and filter by accessibility requirement, venue type and distance. Another way is to type that venue and Access Able into a search engine and you will find the venue’s audit if they have done one.

Here I will collect a list of accessible venmeeting-space-office-reception-1058604ues. However, not all may have had a full access audit so it is advisable always to check with the venue first.  Or look to see if there is an Access Able audit.

If you have any comments or information to add, please contact us. It would be great to keep this list expanding – both in and outside London!

If you would like to do your own audit you could use this one – https://radicalaccessiblecommunities.wordpress.com/the-radical-access-mapping-project/radical-access-mapping-project-vancouver/  – please credit Radical Mapping Project Vancouver.

Sisters of Frida have also produced a toolkit for practical, physical access to events – http://www.sisofrida.org/resources/sisters-of-fridas-accessibility-guide-to-meetings-and-events-a-toolkit/

London

Central London

  • Waterloo Action Centre – wheelchair accessible but not free. For bigger events and meetings.
  • The Cut, 106 the Cut – community room, wheelchair accessible and low cost.
  • Fitzrovia Community Centre (not free)
  • Somers Town Community Association (not free)
  • Holborn Community Association (not free) – https://www.holborncommunity.co.uk/
  • Marchmont Community Centre (not free) – http://www.kcbna.org.uk/aboutus/hire/

North London

East London

  • Whitechapel Ideas Store – not free but is wheelchair accessible – https://www.accessable.co.uk/venues/idea-store-whitechapel
  • Canvas Cafe – community space that’s free – wheelchair accessible but no disabled toilet facilities.
  • Tindlemanor- relatively low cost and is wheelchair accessible.
  • Latin American Women’s Aid – wheelchair accessible – not sure if free.
  • St Luke’s Community Centre – wheelchair accessible but not free

South London

 

Thank you to Sisters Uncut – http://www.sistersuncut.org/ – for providing some venues that they use.

 

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Sideways Times founder Lani Parker shares her thoughts on disability justice and interdependence

Going against the flow

We’re talking about a human relationship of interdependence that values everybody as part of the world that we live in. And not only people but the whole world.

Listen to the podcast

Read the transcript

Lani: Welcome to Sideways Times, a new UK-based podcast in which we talk about the politics of disability and disability justice. Through this podcast I hope to have many conversations which broaden, deepen and challenge our understanding of how to work against ableism and how this connects to other struggles. I’m Lani Parker, and in this edition Andrea D’Cruz interviews me, following requests from some people to hear more of my perspective. We mainly talk about some of my thoughts around disability justice and interdependence, following many conversations with many amazing people.

Andrea: I first learnt about the framework of disability justice from having conversations with you, and it’s something that’s come up in a few of the previous podcasts that you’ve recorded – so I though it’d be really nice if we could have a whole podcast that was you talking about what disability justice means, and what it means to you personally, so maybe we could start – could you give me 3 sentences on what disability justice is, or what it means to you?

Lani: OK, so… disability justice as a framework was kind of put together by some disabled women of colour, or disabled people of colour, in the States, and to me the key things about it are that it connects issues and movements together, and that it has – it’s radically anti-capitalist, and that it has a commitment to interdependence and valuing the gifts that disabled people bring to the world, and so there’s lots of aspects to it, but I would say those are more than 3 sentences, but a little bit about what I think.

Continue reading “Sideways Times founder Lani Parker shares her thoughts on disability justice and interdependence”

Independence and interdependence: an interview with Michelle Daley

Michelle Daley, co-founder of Sisters of Frida, talks to Lani Parker of Sideways Times about black disabled people’s experiences in Britain, intersectionalities with the disabled people’s movement, global privilege and interdependence.

We should keep growing, like a tree. Keep pushing forward, keep going, in all directions.
Michelle Daley

The interview is provided as a podcast with a transcript below.

Continue reading “Independence and interdependence: an interview with Michelle Daley”