Disabled artists are out here: A conversation with Okka

Stairs and Whispers - D/deaf and Disabled Poets Write Back. Edited by Sandra Alland, Khairani Barokka and Daniel SlumanPoet, artist and writer Khairani Barokka (Okka) speaks to Lani Parker of Sideways Times about the importance of narrative, storytelling and emotions as an artist; colonialism, disability, her art and her PhD.

Being a human is confusing, and challenging for everybody. But I’m glad that I feel like the worst of what I’ve gone through in life, knock on wood, was gone through with an understanding of how language can shape and reflect experiences.

Read the transcript:

Khairani Barokka: I am an Indonesian writer, poet and artist in London. I’m a PhD researcher at Goldsmiths in visual cultures, doing a PhD by practice. I have been researching and writing and making for 6 years now on specifically intersectional experimental ways of telling stories, particularly around crip cultures and feminisms. Continue reading “Disabled artists are out here: A conversation with Okka”

Independence and interdependence: an interview with Michelle Daley

Michelle Daley, co-founder of Sisters of Frida, talks to Lani Parker of Sideways Times about black disabled people’s experiences in Britain, intersectionalities with the disabled people’s movement, global privilege and interdependence.

We should keep growing, like a tree. Keep pushing forward, keep going, in all directions.
Michelle Daley

The interview is provided as a podcast with a transcript below.

Continue reading “Independence and interdependence: an interview with Michelle Daley”

Conversation with Steve Graby on Personal Assistance: The Challenge of Autonomy

knotted rope to illustrate tension and solidarityThis month Lani interviews Steve Graby, a Disability Studies researcher at the University of Leeds. They discuss the tensions inherent within the personal assistance employer-employee relationship, as well as the opportunities for solidarity.

Read more about Steve’s work: visit his website or follow him on Twitter.

Download as MP3

Read the transcript below. Continue reading “Conversation with Steve Graby on Personal Assistance: The Challenge of Autonomy”

“Disability justice is the art and the practice of honouring the body” An interview with Lydia X.Z. Brown

In this interview Lydia X.Z Brown  talks about disability justice as a praxis which honours the body and the whole person. Disability justice is a radical framework which requires understanding the interconnected nature of oppression and that we must tackle all forms of oppression in order to change the system we live in. We also talk about differences in language,  tensions within disability movements and the importance of using a variety of tactics amongst other things….

Download as mp3.

Transcript below:

Continue reading ““Disability justice is the art and the practice of honouring the body” An interview with Lydia X.Z. Brown”

Thinking Through Borders

Farzana Khan wrote this piece back in December 2015. It is long but really worth the read. I particularly like her emphasis on building infrastructures of justice; if the infrastructure of justice is not there then infrastructures of injustice are reproduced. Using the framework of borders Khan talks about the politics of solidarity, collective liberation, self-care and more.  With reference to her own work in the UK context, the article explores personal and collective borders, national and international borders and how they interact with each other. She talks about the hard work of being committed to each other and of building interdependence. 

The emphasis on communities comes from the realization that we can’t continue letting our own spaces uphold power structures in the guise of solidarity, that we can’t shy away from hard dynamics, but instead be committed to each other. Real deep-rooted change requires ALL of us. So, in the absence of borders, if we are still committed to their removal, how do we hold ourselves together? Mia Mingus reminds us:

Interdependency is both ‘you and I’ and ‘we’. It is solidarity, in the best sense of the word. It is inscribing community on our skin over and over and over again. It is truly moving together in an oppressive world towards liberation and refusing to let the personal be a scapegoat for the political. It is knowing that one organization, one student or community group is not a movement. It is working in coalition and collaboration. Because the truth is: we need each other. We need each other. And every time we turn away from each other, we turn away from ourselves. We know this. Let us not go around, but instead, courageously through.

As we organize in solidarity, our own borders need to be examined: how are they maintained, and do they work towards holding on to power and privilege?

In the making of movements, how we sustain our movements and ourselves is key. This means doing the internal work, the heart-work, the unearthing of our selves and our organizing spaces. I recognize that the space and capacity to reflect on praxis is tied to privilege, where often the most directly affected within structures of oppression are in the business of survival/resistance/responding without the luxury of thinking deeply about this very work. However, I maintain that this is worthwhile, because it calls us in on our selves. We have to do the work to be better humans for the better world we want to live in, and all the while continue to learn how to do this. Right now is exactly the time to do this, as we sit under the weight of failing state infrastructures, we also sit on the cusp of reimagining what is possible outside of the state.

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Conversation with Eleanor Lisney on Disability, Intersectionality and more

Eleanor Lisney is a founding member of Sisters of Frida, has lived in 4 countries, has 2 children, is an active member of the National Union of Journalists, and tweets at @e_lisney.

Eleanor has been involved with disability movement(s) in the UK since the 1980s. In this podcast she talks about some of what she’s learned from her involvement and why Sisters of Frida’s work is important. We also explore Eleanor’s current thinking about the differences between disability rights and disability justice, the importance of intersectionality, and the meaning of feminism.

Download as mp3.

Transcript below.

Continue reading “Conversation with Eleanor Lisney on Disability, Intersectionality and more”